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Junk Land

A lot about nothing

Jorge Moll Was At The Head Of A Ground Breaking 2006 Study That Has Shed Light On Human Motivation To Help Others:

Jorge Moll is a Brazilian neuroscientist who serves in the role of President-Director at the highly respected D’Or Institute for Research and Education located in Rio De Janiero, Brazil. He is a graduate of Rio De Janiero’s Federal University’s medical school. He embarked on his highly successful career in neuroscience after completing his residency at the same institution. Jorge Moll’s publications in this field are many in number and include works on topics ranging from social behavior in the human species including behavior revolving around moral judgement, ADHD, depression and the human emotions of guilt, embarrassment and shame. Jorge Moll is also a distinguished member of several prestigious scientific societies including the International Neuroethics Society, the Brazilian Academy of Sciences and the Society for Neuroscience.

 

Jorge Moll was the head of a revolutionary study that took place back in 2006. The landmark study, which took place at the National Institute of Health has shed light on some interesting questions regarding the way brain and its physiology has an impact on a person’s moral compass. Jorge Moll conducted the study along with his colleague, neuroscientist Jordan Grafman. The basis of this groundbreaking study was a scan of the brains of those participating in the study while they are given different scenarios regarding giving money to philanthropic organizations versus keeping the money for themselves. The results that the study yielded were very interesting and showed clearly that people experienced activation in the primitive areas of their brains when they did something that benefitted others rather than themselves. This runs contrary to the idea that concepts like morality emanate from a more high system of thinking and may well come from the same areas of the brain that validates more base emotions such as sex or enjoyment of food. The implication is that humans give back to others because it activates the pleasure centers of the brain. There is a further suggestion that Jorge Moll points out from the results of this study. The human concept of right and wrong may originate in these same areas of the brain and may be activated by these same types of actions.